Tag Archive | "repair"

Video: Repairing a Scratch in a Cultured Marble Countertop / Vanity

Tags: , , , , ,

Video: Repairing a Scratch in a Cultured Marble Countertop / Vanity

Posted on 23 September 2016 by cradmin

This video shows one process used to repair a cultured marble vanity countertop that has been scratched. There is not a lot of information on whose methodology this is or where it is filmed, but it does walk through the various grit changes to get the scratch out of this top.

Because cultured marble typically only has a thin gel-coat top, and are relatively inexpensive, few spend the kind of time developing techniques to fix the material. However, this method appears to work.

Let us know what you think.

You may also be interested in this video on solid surface repair or this video on granite countertop repair.

Comments (1)

Video: Repairing an Acrylic Solid Surface Sink

Tags: , , , , ,

Video: Repairing an Acrylic Solid Surface Sink

Posted on 04 May 2016 by cradmin

In this video presented by Karran, a sink provider specializing in “seamless” sinks for laminate, solid surface, quartz and granite, repair techniques are shown for solid surface acrylic sinks. While we would never recommend that homeowners or non-professionals do any work on their own sinks or countertops, this video depicts how easily a small problem could be repaired in solid surface.

You may also be interested in this video on granite countertop repair.

Comments (1)

Wood & Stone Co. Offers Stone/Surfacing Glues

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Wood & Stone Co. Offers Stone/Surfacing Glues

Posted on 15 October 2015 by cradmin

wood and stone 2 acrylic penetrating gluesWood and Stone Company has two types of acrylic penetrating glues made for repairing and laminating granite, quartz surfacing, marble and engineered stone. The first is Wood & Stone Acrylic Penetrating Crack Sealer, which is a thin liquid designed to flow like water and made to fill cracks and reinforce stone and stone-like products. It is for very thin, hairline cracks that flowing glue has difficulty penetrating. It is  clear and cures quickly, according to the company.

The second adhesive product is Wood & Stone Acrylic Super Penetrating Glue, a low-viscosity system for bonding and filling on horizontal surfaces. While it is thinner than standard polyester flowing glues, it is not as thin as the company’s crack sealer, which allows broader usage. According to the company, it is suitable for filling larger cracks, pits and holes. Additionally, because it is clear, users can mix in ground up stone powder to assist in color matching with larger holes, chips and blowouts. And, because of its thinness, it is very suitable for laminating, as it will spread very thin to create tight seams, reports the company.

The company also makes an acrylic knife grade adhesives as well.

You may also be interested in this article on Integra Adhesives bulk adhesives.

Comments (0)

Repairing High Pressure Laminate Countertops

Tags: , , ,

Repairing High Pressure Laminate Countertops

Posted on 23 September 2015 by cradmin

This video produced by Finish Repair, which seems to specialize in the repair of all kinds of materials including laminates, wood and marble, shows how a damaged high pressure laminate (HPL) countertop can be repaired. At first I was skeptical when I ran across the video, but I have to say the results looked pretty good, even when I took the video full screen.

The depiction here isn’t even overly promotional, just explaining the process rather than hyping the product being used. And, the HPL top that was being repaired was not just a primary color, but rather had a complex color. Maybe that made it easier? It’s hard to say without trying it out in person, but it sold me.

We’d be interested to hear if any of you have any experience with this process or any other processes for repairing laminate countertops. Drop us a line or post in the comment section.

You may also be interested in this video on how Wilsonart laminate is made.

Comments (0)

Chemical Concepts Offers Chem-Set Stone Repair Kit

Tags: , , , , , ,

Chemical Concepts Offers Chem-Set Stone Repair Kit

Posted on 14 August 2014 by cradmin

chemical concepts chem-set repair kitChemical Concepts now offers the Chem-Set UV Chip Repair Compound for natural and engineered stone. The adhesive is used when a fast, permanent repair is needed to fix scratches, chips, gouges, holes, cracks and nicks on natural or engineered stone. It incorporates a proprietary curing sheet that ensures a tack-free permanent repair, reports the company. The adhesive is non-yellowing, UV-stable and will not scratch or fracture. It is available in two kit sizes – 10ml or 50ml.

Comments (0)

How To Remove A Scratch From Granite

Tags: , , ,

How To Remove A Scratch From Granite

Posted on 16 May 2014 by cradmin

This video is produced by “ToolandMachineWorks,” and unfortunately, the company shares very little about itself. But the video is a pretty good one that shows the process for removing a scratch from a piece of dark granite. While the process uses Alpha Professional Tools equipment, I’m sure there are other brands of similar equipment that can be used for the same process, so this is a pretty good primer on the subject.

While the video is more than 13 minutes long, it actually condenses some of the steps for time. It also includes some convenient tips for better results during some of the longer segments with the guy performing the repair is just going over the area repeatedly, so there is still something there to keep your attention.

Let us know what you think about the video, or suggest a video of your own by emailing us at info@countertopresource.com.

Comments (0)

Upselling Countertops Can Make for Happier Customers in the End

Tags: , , , , ,

Upselling Countertops Can Make for Happier Customers in the End

Posted on 22 November 2013 by CRadmin2

Cultured Marble Countertop

On a recent trip to visit friends in Russia, I immediately noticed their newly redecorated kitchen. I was duly impressed with everything about it, including the cabinets, the range and oven and the integral sink. However, a closer inspection of the sink revealed dark stains at the bottom and a few chips around the edges. This immediately prompted me to make a closer inspection to confirm my suspicions. The countertop and sink were made from cultured marble, likely with an inferior gel coat. I’ve seen thousands of cultured marble vanities and bathroom sinks, but never have I seen one this new in this poor of a shape.

After admonishing them for not consulting with me first regarding the materials used, I asked what prompted them to go with cultured marble. Several reasons were named, including price, visual appeal and a generous guarantee on materials and installation. They had fallen into an all too familiar trap of buying on price, instead of value. They liked the look of the integral sink, and moving up to laminate would have most likely meant a few more rubles, but also drop-in stainless steel sink, which was not as appealing. However, how happy were they now?

As most who work in the countertop industry believe, cultured marble may be sufficient for bathroom vanity tops and sinks, but most kitchens require a surfacing material that is more durable. The dealer made good on the guarantee, but it ended up becoming a losing proposition for everyone. Their solution was to saw off the original sink flush with the bottom of the countertop and attach a well-sealed replacement. However, the pattern of the new sink was slightly off, and the work left a visible seam covered in silicon, something I doubt would ever fly with consumers in the United States.

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

The lessons to be learned here apply not only to consumers (you get what you pay for; do your homework), but also to fabricators and dealers. Educating the customer is important. If they are buying a product that you aren’t sure they will be happy with in the long run, you should let them know it. In this case, had the customer known the sink was apt to stain or chip with heavy use, they may very well have opted for a more durable material (a win-win for both the customer and the fabricator). Upselling a customer to a more appropriate surface may not have been met with immediate satisfaction, but over time, the decision would hopefully be thought of as sound advice, reinforcing loyalty. In addition, the installer would not have had to spend the extra time and effort repairing a lower-grade product covered by a warranty. We all know call-backs aren’t cheap! If a customer wants to go with an inappropriate product, make the extra effort to upsell them to a material that will last and has a low rate of warrantied service requests and will, ultimately, make them happy. This will keep them satisfied, improve your profits and keep your service personnel focused on new jobs instead of fixing those that have already been completed.

Comments (0)

Solid Surface Countertop Crack Repair

Tags: , , , , , ,

Solid Surface Countertop Crack Repair

Posted on 11 November 2013 by cradmin

Here is a video that shows the complete steps from beginning to ending on how to repair a solid surface countertop. While there are numerous methods for doing this, this is one interesting way. This video was shared by Nurlex Fabrication in the United Kingdom, and shows a pretty complex crack repair in a DuPont Corian countertop.

There are a couple of things that maybe could be done a little better in the video, such as flat sanding, versus tipping the sander on its edge (which could possibly cause low spots in the material), and the narrator uses the term “v-groove” when he means “v-shaped groove” instead of the v-grooving process, but the video is done quite well and the point comes across strongly.

We hope you enjoy this video, and if you have or know of a video that we should share, please send a link to info@countertopresource.com for consideration.

Comments (3)

Solid Surface Repair

Tags: , , , ,

Solid Surface Repair

Posted on 15 April 2013 by cradmin

While solid surface material is not as hard as some of its counterparts (granite, quartz surfacing), one of its selling points  has always been its renewability. Anyone familiar with the material knows that if it is damaged, it can be repaired, usually to where the damaged area cannot be detected when done. All that is required is the right set of tools, the know-how and a color-matched piece of material.

We ran across this useful video showing “wikedfamousmikeal” demonstrating the process for repairing a solid surface countertop that had been damaged, along with the integral sink attached to it.

Obviously, this guy knows his stuff, and from the comments at the end, the customer thought so too:

 

Comments (0)

Surface Link Expands, Offers New Services for Granite, Quartz, Solid Surface

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Surface Link Expands, Offers New Services for Granite, Quartz, Solid Surface

Posted on 06 December 2012 by cradmin

Surface Link Corporation has announced its expansion to cover repairs and refinishing for granite, quartz and solid surface in all 50 U.S. states. In addition to being a certified warranty agent for more than 15 years for most major manufacturers, Surface Link can also handle all of your extra or unwanted restoration/repair work – allowing fabricators to focus on fabrication.

All of the company’s technicians are professionally trained and certified, and work generally takes less than one day to complete. In addition to refinishes, repairs and restorations of any size, the company also offers in-home sink replacements.

Comments (0)




Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here

The Countertop Industry Insider

OR

Subscribe to Get New Posts via Email

Enter your email address to join 182 of the best informed people in the industry who receive notifications of new posts by email. You can choose to receive notifications weekly or 1 per day, excluding weekends holidays.

Join 182 other subscribers



CountertopResource on Social Media






Advertisement



Advertisement


Webutation
WEB RATING